Stuart Campbell (Obstetrician and Gynaecologist)


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Professor Stuart Campbell was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and graduated from the medical school of Glasgow University. During his training he worked with Ian Donald, who had published some of the first papers on the use of ultrasound in obstetrics.Campbell went on to become one of the pioneers too, publishing papers on fetal biometry, and developing charts of fetal measurements such the biparietal diameter and head circumference, and formulae for estimating fetal weight using ultrasound. He went on to work at Queen Charlotte's Hospital in London, before being appointed Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at King's College Hospital, where he established a fetal medicine unit of internation renown (now Harris-Birthright Research Centre for Fetal Medicine), where other leading fetal medicine practitioners such as Professor Kypros Nicolaides, and Charles Rodeck would later train and work. Campbell's work went on to describe the use of ultrasound to diagnose fetal anomalies, and then the use of Doppler ultrasound, in particular uteroplacental Doppler, in the assesment of 'high-risk' pregnancies. Professor Campbell went on to become Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at St George's Hospital Medical School before his retirement. He was founding President of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology ("ISUOG"), and the first editor of the journal Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology ("The White Journal"), one of the leading journals in obstetrics and gynaecology and in acoustics.In 1992 he was awarded the Ian Donald Gold Medal of ISUOG in recognition of his contribution to ultrasound in obstetrics & gynecology, with over 400 peer-reviewed publications to his name at the time.


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