Dissociative disorders


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Dissociative DisordersDissociative Disorders, ( DSM-IV, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) are defined as conditions that involve disruptions or breakdowns of memory, awareness, identity and/or perception. The hypothesis is that symptoms can result, to the extent of interfering with a person's general functioning, when one or more of these functions is disrupted.The four dissociative disorders listed in the DSM IV TR are as follows:
  • Depersonalization disorder (DSM-IV Codes 300.6Depersonalization Disorder, ( DSM-IV 300.6, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition)) - periods of detachment from self or surrounding which may be experienced as "unreal" (lacking in control of or "outside of" self) while retaining awareness that this is only a feeling and not a reality.
  • Dissociative Amnesia (DSM-IV Codes 300.12Dissociative Amnesia (formerly Psychogenic Amnesia) ( DSM-IV 300.12, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition)) - noticeable impairment of recall resulting from emotional trauma
  • Dissociative fugue (DSM-IV Codes 300.13Dissociative Fugue (formerly Psychogenic Fugue) ( DSM-IV 300.13, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition)) - physical desertion of familiar surroundings and experience of impaired recall of the past. This may lead to confusion about actual identity and the assumption of a new identity.
  • Dissociative identity disorder'(DSM-IV Codes 300.14Dissociative Identity Disorder (formerly Multiple Personality Disorder) ( DSM-IV 300.14, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition))'' - the alternation of two or more distinct personality states with impaired recall, among personality states, of important information.
  • In addition, there's the diagnosis of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV Codes 300.15Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified ( DSM-IV 300.15, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition)) which can be used for forms of pathological dissociation not covered by any of the specified dissociative disorders.In a 2007 study, only 28.7% of the dissociative participants had received psychiatric treatment previouslyPrevalence of dissociative disorders among women in the general population ( Departments of Psychiatry, Istanbul University and Cumhuriyet University Medical Faculty, Turkey, January 2007).


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